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of the constitution. every major political issue we've had, foreign policy is very much a constitutional issue. it's very much studying the way that we are. >> tying those things together if i may, one of the important policies with the five, four vote that was against wiretapping without mirandized and suggests that the rate precisely the word for dear slater wrote with prohibition. >> a quick question on this. we don't do that now. it's just done by law. >> because laws are very easy to undo. the majority of congress today passes the love with the affordable health care act. it's undone by this time. before there was a repeal of any amendment, it it's beyond being a fat dude by the ripples and waves of partisan policy. [inaudible] [inaudible] so that's about the drinking age. the federal government has a law to improve their highways. if you want the money it makes her changes. so everybody in the spaces can or cannot be sent thing. so we've got money for you. if you want the money you have to tell your citizens -- [inaudible] >> it is based on the commerce clause. the federal government could p
, for instance, one of president obama's closest advisers. she was his principal foreign policy adviser during his first campaign and helped shape his world view. they have a similar world view. all of this signifies susan rice would be influential when she goes to speak to diplomats around the world and world leaders and also in formulating foreign policy, which is very good for the state department. on the downside, you see what's happening with the benghazi affair. she's likely to have a bruising confirmation process. some republican senators said they might hold up her nomination. that could drag out a while. john kerry, on the other hand, would be easily confirmable. you see the senators are encouraging president obama to nominate him. senator kerry also has a lot of world stature, has relationships with many world leaders. he's seen as someone who could help build on those relationships to further foreign policy and also senator kerry also, as chairman of the foreign relations committee, very popular chairman, has a lot of diplomatic experience. president obama has used him you know out
. >> ambassador, israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see any sunlight between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it's a remarkable relationship between one of the nations that have the smallest majority in israel and our great country, and it's almost a mystical relationship when you think of how much support we have showered on israel and how much support we get back. it's due to the fact that this is not just jewish support, we're only 2% of the population in the united states. it's because we have shared values, shared enemies, and islamic terrorism. that many people in the united states view israel as the holy land not just jews but non-jews as well. there's a remarkable time when there is so much polarization between the republicans and democrats. it's one of the few foreign policy issues that actually unite democrats and republicans. >> what -- the future of the jews, is your book title provocative in any way? do you mean to be? >> i mean it to be. the question is can of peopl
will understand that we cannot discern in our foreign policy our prior opinions. there are a number of issues on which we do not agree, on a conclusion that would be reached. >> mr. speaker, given the distinct history of our country and the legacy left behind in the region, does the foreign secretary agree that we have a unique ability to show leadership and courage for the palestinians and israelis who want peace. and surely, this can be one way to signal that leadership. i ask them to think again. >> we have a unique responsibility and we do not have the same power as in the 1940s, although we do have it in a new and different form. we have a great responsibility as a member of the u.n. u.n. security council. but the problem is giving hope to palestinians and israelis, that is a very important point that she made. it is important that we do that and give hope to people on both sides of that divide. and that is what i am seeking to do today. >> recognizing this position to an extent, but i'm sorry to say i think there are a lot of fundamentals -- [inaudible] given that countries around the w
. and she said, no way. i said right. we spent a lot of time on all the traditional foreign-policy issues. we are focused on being domestic and what we want to do is report on education. we don't want a piece on everyone else has done. what we want to do is look at education through the filter of national security, and basically asked the question, what is the relationship between the challenges about k-12 education and national security of the united states. in turn turn didn't turn out to be a terribly hard thing. she was there. and they cochaired the task force report. the version of this commission. the whole idea of this group in this background, educators and also those who come together in the seam states and say, they raise the question about what is the relationship between the educational challenges we face in the national security challenges. to recap this issue, it is always the fact that it reflects the fact that you are here at the risk of being redundant. but what we wanted to do is get people who are interested in foreign affairs rather than the chronicle of higher educati
, a centrist on foreign policy has expressed support for some of the obama administrations recent national security policy. again, that's from the hill reporting on foreign policy magazine's article yesterday. now, this is from the washington times this morning. hill panels play musical chairs, this is about the new chairs of the house committees in the house of representatives, and from yesterday's newspaper, the hill, gmple o.p. women press boehner for top committee spots. this is molly hooper's article. molly hooper reports on the leadership in congress for the hill newspaper. molly, who are some of the new chairs? caller: well, the new chairs happen to mostly be men. in fact, they're all men, with the exception of two open spots that have yet to be assigned by speaker boehner. but we're basically going to see a lot of the old faces. there's seven committees have new chairman this year, or will in the next congress. you'll be seeing a conservative republican from texas, atop financial services. ed royce, california republican of foreign affairs. representative mike mccall, texas republi
that he has on foreign policy in the republican senate caucus? mika and i talked to so many people over the past two, three years that say we want, republican senators, we want out of afghanistan but, you know what, we just sort of stay out of john's way. how many times have we heard that? >> a lot. it's disturbing. >> we hear it all the time. they stay out of his way. are they going to blindly follow and, again, i love and respect senator mccain, but i don't want my party to blindly follow him over a cliff on this battle especially if it's a personal one. >> well, on this battle it may be a personal one. i think the answer to your broader question is that republicans will continue to respect and follow his advice and syria is the next big issue that he is pounding away on. he was at a forum at the museum yesterday and crying out for american leadership on syria which means more engagement, more involvement. so there are a lot of big issues that he has huge influence on because of his experiences, his personal history. this issue i'm not so sure they'll follow him on. two of the three s
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
do anything other than a spectacular job. but i'm a political guy, not a foreign policy guy. i'm just unable to really render a very knowledgeable -- >> let me rephrase the question. politically speaking, who would the president be better off nominating? >> politically speaking? probably ambassador rice because she would represent sort of new and different administration. but i don't think people when they look at the secretary of state, i don't think that there's much of a political gain there. i say that, but i say it without a lot of conviction or a lot of authority. i think the one that you want is the one that does the best job because if they get in there and do something wrong, the politics of it are horrendous for you. i'm just not that -- that's not my area of expertise. >> mary, what's your thought? >> he cannot nominate susan rice and not because of the benghazi scandal but because of her previous tenure at state where she doesn't have a good record and her u.n. record is not good. we don't have time to go through the particulars, but i think senator kerry would not only be
as chairman of the judiciary committee subcommittee on immigration policy and enforcement. he understands the nuances of our legal immigration system and the vital importance of secure borders, especially as it relates to his role as vice chairman of the foreign awares -- affairs committee he brought a unique perspective to the foreign affairs committee, having served eight years on the permanent select committee on intelligence, and counterintelligence subcommittee. in the aftermath of september 11, congressman fwalingly tchared subcommittee on internal -- international, excuse me, terrorism nonproliferation and human rights and held one of the first hearings on the 9/11 commission's recommendations, a hearing that led to more than 10 provisions that were included in the final bill. congressman gallegly's long, distinguished career has been supported by the love and support of his wife janis and their four children and 10 grarne. congressman gallegly's dedication to our national security, strong borders, legal immigration, has contribute immensely to the betterment of our nation and we c
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10